How to Pass the Vermont Permit Test

vermont-road-signAre you excited to get on the road and experience all of the freedom that a Vermont driver’s license has to offer? If so, you should begin educating yourself on the requirements you will need to complete to get there. Our simple and easy-to-understand guide will help you learn about each step of the process.

In Vermont, all young drivers must complete a Graduated Driver’s License Program (GDL), which helps ensure that they have the time to learn crucial driving skills while remaining in a low-risk environment. GDL programs have been shown to reduce traffic accidents caused by a lack of driving experience.

The Vermont GDL program includes three important stages:

  • Learner Permit
  • Junior Operator’s License
  • Operator’s License

In this article, you will learn how to pass the Vermont permit test and eventually go on to earn unrestricted driving privileges.

Stage I: The Vermont Learner Permit

When you are 15 years old, you can apply for your Learner Permit in the state of Vermont. This requires that you pass a written test (or permit test) that will check your knowledge of road laws, traffic signs and signals.

Study Like Crazy

We are happy to offer a free copy of the Vermont Driver’s Manual for you to use in your studies. Read the entire book, devoting extra time to any sections you don’t feel sure about. Remember, very few people do well on the test if they don’t study first.

Make Sure to Take Practice Exams

Taking our Vermont practice permit test is one of the best things you can do to prepare. Our version includes much of the same subject matter you will see on the real thing, and after taking it, you should be able to gauge how prepared you are.

Call the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and Make an Appointment for Your Test

On appointment day, visit your DMV testing location, bringing along:

  • Your completed application form, signed by your parent or guardian.
  • Your birth certificate, U.S. passport or other form of certified identification.
  • Your Social Security number.
  • $47 in fees.

At this point, you will be given the permit test. It includes 20 multiple-choice questions, and as long as you devoted plenty of time to study, passing it should be fairly easy. When you finish, you will also be given a vision test. If you wear contact lenses or glasses, be sure to have them with you.

Start Practicing

Now that you have your Learner Permit, you will need to complete a few requirements before moving on to the next step. First, you will need to complete a state-approved driver’s education course, which must include 30 hours of classroom instruction, six hours of observation and six hours of behind-the-wheel training. You will also need to complete 40 hours of practice driving under the supervision of your parent or guardian, with 10 of those hours taking place at night.

Stage II: The Vermont Junior Operator’s License

When you are 16 years old, you have held your permit for a full year and you have completed the requirements of the first stage of the GDL process, you can apply for your Junior Operator’s License.

Call the DMV and schedule a driving test, and on testing day, bring along:

  • The certificate that shows you completed driver’s education.
  • The Driving Practice Log Sheet, which shows you completed your supervised practice driving.
  • The same identification documents you used before.
  • $48 in fees.
  • A registered and insured vehicle to use for the test.

Now, you will be given a behind-the-wheel driving test, which will check how well you operate a vehicle and pay attention to traffic laws. When you pass, you will be given your Junior Operator’s License, which has some restrictions. Unless supervised by a licensed driver age 25 or above, you cannot:

  • Drive with any passengers for the first three months of holding the license.
  • Drive with passengers other than family members for the second three months of holding the license.
  • Drive to make money (such as delivering pizzas).

Stage III: The Vermont Full License

After holding your Junior Operator’s License for six full months without any violations, the restrictions will be removed. Congratulations! You are now a fully licensed driver.

Additional Information

Be sure to drive carefully and follow the rules while holding your Junior Operator’s License. Any violation, such as carrying passengers or driving for reasons of employment, could result in a recall of your license for up to 90 days.